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"The goal of all life is death"

— Freud, 1955, vol. 8; Freud

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What did Anglo-Saxons and the Samurai have in common?

Both honored women.

You can evidence this in the respective cultures’ classical literature. In the case of the Japanese culture, one text is the Budoshoshinshu: of Daidoji Yuzann

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calehor:

"One Arrow, One Life" by Mark Araujo

calehor:

"One Arrow, One Life" by Mark Araujo

(via bullstron)

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Old Man by Lash-Upon-Lash
"An old man and his son lived in an abandoned fortress on the side of a hill. Their only possession of value was a horse.
 One day, the horse ran away. The neighbours came by to offer sympathy. “That’s really bad!” they said. “How do you know?” asked the old man.
 The next day, the horse returned, bringing with it several wild horses. The old man and his son shut them all inside the gate. The neighbours hurried over. “That’s really good!” they said. How do you know?” asked the old man.
 The following day, the son tried riding one of the wild horses, fell off, and broke his leg. The neighbours came around as soon as they heard the news. “That’s really bad!” they said. “How do you know?” asked the old man.
 The day after that, the army came through, forcing the local young men into service to fight a faraway battle against the Northern barbarians. Many of them would never return. But the son couldn’t go because he’d broken his leg.” - translated by Benjamin Hoff, Huai-nan-tse

Old Man by Lash-Upon-Lash

"An old man and his son lived in an abandoned fortress on the side of a hill. Their only possession of value was a horse.


One day, the horse ran away. The neighbours came by to offer sympathy. “That’s really bad!” they said. “How do you know?” asked the old man.


The next day, the horse returned, bringing with it several wild horses. The old man and his son shut them all inside the gate. The neighbours hurried over. “That’s really good!” they said. How do you know?” asked the old man.


The following day, the son tried riding one of the wild horses, fell off, and broke his leg. The neighbours came around as soon as they heard the news. “That’s really bad!” they said. “How do you know?” asked the old man.


The day after that, the army came through, forcing the local young men into service to fight a faraway battle against the Northern barbarians. Many of them would never return. But the son couldn’t go because he’d broken his leg.” - translated by Benjamin Hoff, Huai-nan-tse

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"May you get what you want and may you live in interesting times"

— Chinese curse

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"There are things you can never put in words; you can only feel them in your body"

— African traditional healer quoted by M. Vera Bührmann

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"I have made a ceaseless effort not to ridicule, not to bewail, not to scorn human actions, but to understand them."

— Baruch Spinoza

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pebble hand by alamouso
“Further conceive, I beg, that a stone, while continuing in motion, should be capable of thinking and knowing, that it is endeavoring, as far as it can, to continue to move. Such a stone, being conscious merely of its own endeavor and not at all indifferent, would believe itself to be completely free, and would think that it continued in motion solely because of its own wish. This is that human freedom, which all boast that they possess, and which consists solely in the fact, that men are conscious of their own desire, but are ignorant of the causes whereby that desire has been determined.”  ― Baruch Spinoza

pebble hand by alamouso

“Further conceive, I beg, that a stone, while continuing in motion, should be capable of thinking and knowing, that it is endeavoring, as far as it can, to continue to move. Such a stone, being conscious merely of its own endeavor and not at all indifferent, would believe itself to be completely free, and would think that it continued in motion solely because of its own wish. This is that human freedom, which all boast that they possess, and which consists solely in the fact, that men are conscious of their own desire, but are ignorant of the causes whereby that desire has been determined.”
― Baruch Spinoza

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"…to the great pains you must go…"

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with a candle by redreddaisy
“…A lustful search in the dark is all you’ll ever come to know” - Donny Shankle

with a candle by redreddaisy

“…A lustful search in the dark is all you’ll ever come to know” - Donny Shankle

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zoeyandjasper:

Never go on adventures without your trusty sidekick. xoxo Zoey and Jasper

zoeyandjasper:

Never go on adventures without your trusty sidekick. xoxo Zoey and Jasper

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seppuku by Mers-J “They tell us that Suicide is the greatest piece of Cowardice… That Suicide is wrong; when it is quite obvious that there is nothing in this world to which every man has a more unassailable title than to his own life and person.” ― Arthur Schopenhauer

seppuku by Mers-J “They tell us that Suicide is the greatest piece of Cowardice… That Suicide is wrong; when it is quite obvious that there is nothing in this world to which every man has a more unassailable title than to his own life and person.”
― Arthur Schopenhauer

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"Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a little youth, every going to rest and sleep a little death." - Arthur Schopenhauer

"Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a little youth, every going to rest and sleep a little death." - Arthur Schopenhauer

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stillness around by augenweide
 “Let your mind be like clouds going by; the clouds going by are mindless. Let your stillness be as the valley spirit; the valley spirit is undying.When action accompanies stillness and stillness combines with action, then the duality of action and stillness no longer exists.” - Pei-Chien (1185-1246), Thomas Cleary.

stillness around by augenweide


“Let your mind be like clouds going by; the clouds going by are mindless. Let your stillness be as the valley spirit; the valley spirit is undying.When action accompanies stillness and stillness combines with action, then the duality of action and stillness no longer exists.” - Pei-Chien (1185-1246), Thomas Cleary.